"Humans within this planet now are the newest experience of the universe in what, biologically, always seems to come down to cycles: of unity to individuation, through which arises conflict, negotiations happen, cooperation is arrived at; and we go to unity again at the next higher level."
- Elisabet Sahtouris PhD, Evolutionary Biologist and Futurist

(via You Are a Cell - Our Mind Is the Limit)


Desire is the wish to consume. To imbibe, devour, ingest and digest – annihilate. Desire needs no other prompt but the presence of alterity. …  the urge of self-destruction: desire is contaminated, from its birth, by the death wish. This is, though, its closely guarded secret; guarded mostly from itself. 
Love is, on the other hand, the wish to care, and to preserve the object of the care. An impulse to expand, to go beyond, to stretch to what is ‘out there’. To ingest, absorb and assimilate the subject in the object, not vice versa as in the case of desire. ..the self is, bit by bit, transplanted onto the world. The loving self expands through giving itself away to the loved object. 
 If desire is self-destructive, love is self-perpetuating. 

(via Liquid Love: On the Frailty of Human Bonds - Zygmunt Bauman)

Desire is the wish to consume. To imbibe, devour, ingest and digest – annihilate. Desire needs no other prompt but the presence of alterity. …  the urge of self-destruction: desire is contaminated, from its birth, by the death wish. This is, though, its closely guarded secret; guarded mostly from itself. 

Love is, on the other hand, the wish to care, and to preserve the object of the care. An impulse to expand, to go beyond, to stretch to what is ‘out there’. To ingest, absorb and assimilate the subject in the object, not vice versa as in the case of desire. ..the self is, bit by bit, transplanted onto the world. The loving self expands through giving itself away to the loved object. 

 If desire is self-destructive, love is self-perpetuating. 

(via Liquid Love: On the Frailty of Human Bonds - Zygmunt Bauman)

Man such as we know him, the “man-machine,” the man who cannot “do,” and with whom and through whom everything “happens,” cannot have a permanent and single I.

His I changes as quickly as his thoughts, feelings and moods, and he makes a profound mistake in considering himself always one and the same person; in reality he is always a different person, not the one he was a moment ago.

G. I. Gurdjieff, In Search of the Miraculous (1949)
“God must act and pour himself into us when we are ready, in other words when we are totally empty of self.”

Meister Eckhart, Eckhart Society–His Teachings–Letting Ourselves Go–Sermon 4: http://www.eckhartsociety.org/ eckhart/his-teachings; see Maurice O’C. Walshe, trans., The Complete Mystical Works of Meister Eckhart (New York: Crossroad Publishing Co., 2010).

(via God as a Verb)